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Links With Your Coffee - Saturday

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I keep half an eye on the medicine displays in stores when I shop, and this year is the first time I have seen Oscillococcinum being sold. Airborne as been a standard for years, but Airborne has been joined by Oscillococcinum on the shelves. Dumb and dumber. It may be a bad case of confirmation bias, but it seems I am seeing more iocane powder, I mean oscillococcinum, at the stores.

It's been a marvellous year for bullshit. We saw quantitative evidence showing that drug adverts aimed at doctors are routinely factually inaccurate, while pharmaceutical company ghostwriters were the secret hands behind letters to the Times, and a whole series of academic papers. We saw more drug companies and even regulators withholding evidence from doctors and patients that a drug was dangerous - the most important and neglected ethical issue in modern medicine -- and that whistleblowers have a rubbish life.


 

Comments

If you really want to see a doctor get pissed, start your visit with "Doctor Oz says..."

Since the scientific consensus on GMOs seems to be that they are no more harmful to human health than conventional crops, using that as an argument against them is stupid. However, as these Wikileaks show, Monsanto's "considerable planting seed business" is really what's at issue. The leaks reveal two other disturbing facts:

1.) There is almost no difference between Monsanto's PR rhetoric and official proclamations emanating from Washington and other capitals.

2.) Covert revenge against anti-GMO activists is a key component of Monsanto's (and their government minions') efforts to dominate the food supply.

The sooner activists shift away from the probably fallacious food safety aspects of their argument and towards the much more pertinent corporate hegemony argument, the better.

The sooner activists shift away from the probably fallacious food safety aspects of their argument and towards the much more pertinent corporate hegemony argument, the better.

It's a banner day when BDM with only a little hedging agrees the food safety aspects of GMOs is not currently a major concern. As to corporate hegemony, that is a problem across the entire corporate world, not just food. It applies equally well to energy, pharmaceuticals, the auto industry, even organic foods when corporations get involved. It is something that waxes and wanes depending on numerous factors many political, as well as corporate scandals. . . The crux of the issue is corporate personhood, as long as that exists the problem will be with us. That is where the fight needs to take place, and not by opposing technologies that can and do benefit people. We don't refuse to get our children vaccinated, at least those that aren't plain stupid, because a corporation makes a profit from it and the same applies to GM technologies.

It's a banner day when BDM with only a little hedging agrees the food safety aspects of GMOs is not currently a major concern.

My concern all along, going all the way back to the Mike Specter video that sparked this debate, has been the corporate hegemony aspect, not food safety.

that is a problem across the entire corporate world, not just food. It applies equally well to energy, pharmaceuticals, the auto industry, even organic foods when corporations get involved.

And if you had posted articles on those topics, then that's what I'd be commenting on. Again, your otherwise acute sense of skepticism seems to evaporate whenever GMOs are brought up.

We don't refuse to get our children vaccinated, at least those that aren't plain stupid, because a corporation makes a profit from it and the same applies to GM technologies.

Actually, corporations don't profit from most vaccines. And for the gazillionth time, I am not opposed to GMOs simply because Monsanto or some other corporation profits from them. As I've said repeatedly, the best case scenario is one in which someone (or some corporation) can profit by doing good in the world. Like the villain in "Chinatown," a clip of which I posted here several weeks ago, Monsanto isn't content simply earning a profit, they (and Syngenta and ConAgra, etc.) want to own the future. And whether they realize it or not, Pam Ronald, David Tribe, Bruce Chassy, et al. are facilitating that aim.

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