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Cell phones continue to be a focus of epidemiological studies and public concern, despite the fact that so far there is no compelling evidence of any health risk from cell phones. Concerns are likely to be sparked anew with the report of a study linking cell phone use to behavioral problems in children.


 

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Hidden faces: I was looking for a design - you know, like Mary - when I happened upon the answer, so the 1st one took me a nit (30 or so seconds?). The 2nd one hit me immediately, since I knew what to search for.

Expert? When I left school teaching and became a college lecturer I apparently became an 'expert' overnight. I would then introduce myself to new student groups as "Your local Expert on Education", defining 'expert' as being a Portmanteau word, combining the word 'ex' meaning something that was (eg an ex-husband) and the word 'spurt' meaning a rapid expulsion of liquid. Thus 'Expert - a has-been, lively drip'.

There’s a saying in story-telling that if you have to tell your audience that something is interesting, it isn’t. That’s how I feel about experts as well.

Amen to that.

and Marie Clair - isn't she just a magazine?? ;~)

or magazin?

re: Illusions of Control

comment: I might have told you this, my fav elevator story.

A new high rise office building was constructed. The elevators were very slow. Complaints ensued. The engineering solution was way out of budget, so the project manager instead installed mirrors by each elevator. Complaints suddenly stopped. Given the opportunity to preen, elevator time passed without notice or concern. In that case, passing time pleasurably made it pass faster. 'Course, the opposite phenomenon occurs when annoying music is played while one is on telephone hold.

re: correlation and causality

I think confusion between correlation and causality is often the toughest error to discern; for a quest to understand causality quite naturally and appropriately commences with search for correlations. But then, once we've found the correlations, we forget that that was supposed to be just the first step of the analysis, not the last.

re: "they were told about 100 patients, slowly, one by one, each time hearing whether the patient got Batarim or not, and each time hearing whether they got better."

Unless the poor subjects were provided with pencil and paper, their actual analysis capabilities were nearly completely disabled by a need to remember 2 long variable sums (drug & cure). argh. What a nightmare. I'd have been knowingly totally random in my assessment the moment I ran out of fingers. Hell, I can't even remember a phone number for more than 2 minutes.

re: Illusions of Control

comment: I might have told you this, my fav elevator story.

A new high rise office building was constructed. The elevators were very slow. Complaints ensued. The engineering solution was way out of budget, so the project manager instead installed mirrors by each elevator, and announced the problem solved. Complaints suddenly stopped. Given the opportunity to preen, elevator time passed without notice or concern. In that case, passing time pleasurably made it pass faster. 'Course, the opposite phenomenon occurs when annoying music is played while one is on telephone hold.

re: correlation and causality

I think confusion between correlation and causality is one of the easiest errors to make; for a quest to understand causality quite naturally and appropriately commences with search for correlations. But then, once we've found the them, we forget that that was supposed to be just the first step of the analysis, not the last.

re: "they were told about 100 patients, slowly, one by one, each time hearing whether the patient got Batarim or not, and each time hearing whether they got better."

Unless the poor subjects were provided with pencil and paper, their actual analysis capabilities were nearly completely disabled by a need to remember 2 long variable sums (drug & cure). argh. What a nightmare. I'd have been knowingly totally random in my assessment the moment I ran out of fingers. Hell, I can't even remember a phone number for more than 2 minutes.

Nice connection of articles NOrm - from Illusions of control to the cell phones and behavior study (what's next - facebook?) to the expert deconstruction.

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