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Links With Your Coffee - Thursday

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  • One from the archives, magic underwear

  • Mark Tran: The secret literary life of George W Bush | World news | guardian.co.uk

    I guess I'm just a piker when it comes to reading since I was only able to get through 79 this year

    Throughout his career, George Bush cultivated the image of the common man. Unlike Al Gore or John Kerry, he was a guy Americans would be happy to have a beer with - well, fruit juice maybe, as the president gave up the bottle long ago.

    Now comes incontrovertible evidence that Bush's country bumpkin persona was a bit of a front. Karl Rove, in a piece for the Wall Street Journal, tells us that underneath that bluff exterior, Bush was, if not exactly an intellectual, an avid reader. According to Rove - often referred to as Bush's brain - the two competed for the last four years over who read the most books. By the end of 2006, Bush had read a highly respectable 95 books to Rove's 110. That works out at about two books a week - a fairly impressive feat for such real masters of the universe.


  • Mano Singham's Web Journal: And now for something completely different…
    I like comedies. And within that genre of films, I particularly like parodies. The best ones are those that are based on clichés of particular genres or specific stories that are well known, since a successful parody depends crucially on the ability of the audience to immediately recognize allusions to the original

    A parody idea is not hard to come up with. What is hard is to be able to sustain the conceit over the length of a film. Even in the written form, short article parodies are difficult (I know because I have tried and failed miserably) and only a skilled writer can pull it off. I often come across attempts at parodies that seemed to have started out as a single good idea but the writer could not sustain the conceit and it soon becomes painful to read. The ability to maintain a light tough and not to belabor the point is a skill that only a few seem to be able to master. Stephen Leacock and S. J. Perelman are two writers who were good at it. As a very young boy I read Perelman's Somewhere a Roscoe, a parody of the hard-boiled detective story, and I was hooked on parodies for life.


  • Lawsuit seeks to take 'so help me God' out of inaugural - CNN.com

  • Language Log » More (dis)fluency and (in)coherence
    As a public figure, you're in trouble when the media are less interested in what you have to say than in how you say it. This is now the sad situation of Caroline Kennedy, whose filled pauses seem to be getting more press than any other aspect of her bid for Hillary Clinton's senate seat.

  • The Last Road Trip / Freakishly cheap gas? Nation broke? Just hit the road

  • Books - Still Revered for ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ and the Glass Family, J. D. Salinger Remains Elusive at 90 - NYTimes.com

  • Doing the Hokey Cokey 'could be hate crime' - Telegraph

  • The Millions: A Reading Resolution

    I'm in.



 

Comments

Now comes incontrovertible evidence that Bush's country bumpkin persona was a bit of a front. Karl Rove, in a piece for the Wall Street Journal, tells us that underneath that bluff exterior, Bush was, if not exactly an intellectual, an avid reader. According to Rove - often referred to as Bush's brain - the two competed for the last four years over who read the most books. By the end of 2006, Bush had read a highly respectable 95 books to Rove's 110.

...and Karl Rove wouldn't lie to us, would he?

Trying to renew interest in the Bush library?

I'm in on the reading list, too. You and George W. have inspired me although I don't expect to hit those numbers (even your paltry 79 Norm :).

Does everyone recall hearing the same whining chorus about Solzhenitsyn (in neighboring Vermont, by the way) going into seclusion? Salinger has more than made his contribution to society such as it is (and to the limited extent to which it will attend to the message of his fiction) -- he has more richly earned the right to be left alone than a century's worth of Times columnists ever could (much as the rest of us may desire that some lit critics would desire seclusion).

you mean to tell me that the president of USA has the time to read 100 books a year, in between all his other engagements, leisurely and business?

I'll believe it when a non-Rovian source comes forward.

This seems like another attempt by neo-cons to rewrite history and make Bush out to be a decent president

"Childrens do learn."

bush has been caught lying before about his reading - why would this new story be remotely believable? http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/11/13/MN100771.DTL

There's no way Bush reads that much. I'd be surprised if he's read even five books this year. The Bible cover to cover? Hahahahaha!

True, his image as a folksy cowboy was pure fabrication. Not because he's really a bookworm, but because he's rich daddy's boy, a privileged fratboy and a drunk. He's like those jerks and the bad guys in all those high school and college movies. Everybody hates those guys, so he needed to come up with a new image.

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