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Clinton: Barack Obama Is My Candidate

"No Way, No How, No McCain"

Hillary was excellent. She played all the right notes, and played well, in the right order. She was right to spend a lot of time dwelling on her campaign, which so many people worked on and fought for. She knows very well that her supporters' emotional investment isn't something she can lightly hand over to someone else.

But she also hit McCain hard and gave the best pro-Obama argument of the convention. Yes, even better than Michelle's message.

People should compare this speech with the "dream will never die" speech by Kennedy at the 1980 convention, or the fight by Reagan people in the '76 GOP convention. HRC could have taken that route but she did just the opposite.— dende blogger



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I am honored to be here tonight. A proud mother. A proud Democrat. A proud American. And a proud supporter of Barack Obama.

My friends, it is time to take back the country we love.

Whether you voted for me, or voted for Barack, the time is now to unite as a single party with a single purpose. We are on the same team, and none of us can sit on the sidelines.

This is a fight for the future. And it's a fight we must win.

I haven't spent the past 35 years in the trenches advocating for children, campaigning for universal health care, helping parents balance work and family, and fighting for women's rights at home and around the world ... to see another Republican in the White House squander the promise of our country and the hopes of our people.

And you haven't worked so hard over the last 18 months, or endured the last eight years, to suffer through more failed leadership.

No way. No how. No McCain.

Barack Obama is my candidate. And he must be our president.

Tonight we need to remember what a presidential election is really about. When the polls have closed, and the ads are finally off the air, it comes down to you -- the American people, your lives, and your children's futures.

For me, it's been a privilege to meet you in your homes, your workplaces, and your communities. Your stories reminded me everyday that America's greatness is bound up in the lives of the American people -- your hard work, your devotion to duty, your love for your children, and your determination to keep going, often in the face of enormous obstacles.

You taught me so much, you made me laugh, and ... you even made me cry. You allowed me to become part of your lives. And you became part of mine.

I will always remember the single mom who had adopted two kids with autism, didn't have health insurance and discovered she had cancer. But she greeted me with her bald head painted with my name on it and asked me to fight for health care.

I will always remember the young man in a Marine Corps T-shirt who waited months for medical care and said to me: "Take care of my buddies; a lot of them are still over there ... and then will you please help take care of me?"

I will always remember the boy who told me his mom worked for the minimum wage and that her employer had cut her hours. He said he just didn't know what his family was going to do.

I will always be grateful to everyone from all fifty states, Puerto Rico and the territories, who joined our campaign on behalf of all those people left out and left behind by the Bush Administration.

To my supporters, my champions -- my sisterhood of the traveling pantsuits -- from the bottom of my heart: Thank you.

You never gave in. You never gave up. And together we made history.

Along the way, America lost two great Democratic champions who would have been here with us tonight. One of our finest young leaders, Arkansas Democratic Party Chair, Bill Gwatney, who believed with all his heart that America and the South could be and should be Democratic from top to bottom.

And Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, a dear friend to many of us, a loving mother and courageous leader who never gave up her quest to make America fairer and smarter, stronger and better. Steadfast in her beliefs, a fighter of uncommon grace, she was an inspiration to me and to us all.

Our heart goes out to Stephanie's son, Mervyn, Jr., and Bill's wife, Rebecca, who traveled to Denver to join us at our convention.

Bill and Stephanie knew that after eight years of George Bush, people are hurting at home, and our standing has eroded around the world. We have a lot of work ahead.

Jobs lost, houses gone, falling wages, rising prices. The Supreme Court in a right-wing headlock and our government in partisan gridlock. The biggest deficit in our nation's history. Money borrowed from the Chinese to buy oil from the Saudis.

Putin and Georgia, Iraq and Iran.

I ran for president to renew the promise of America. To rebuild the middle class and sustain the American Dream, to provide the opportunity to work hard and have that work rewarded, to save for college, a home and retirement, to afford the gas and groceries and still have a little left over each month.

To promote a clean energy economy that will create millions of green collar jobs.

To create a health care system that is universal, high quality, and affordable so that parents no longer have to choose between care for themselves or their children or be stuck in dead end jobs simply to keep their insurance.

To create a world class education system and make college affordable again.

To fight for an America defined by deep and meaningful equality -- from civil rights to labor rights, from women's rights to gay rights, from ending discrimination to promoting unionization to providing help for the most important job there is: caring for our families. To help every child live up to his or her God-given potential.

To make America once again a nation of immigrants and a nation of laws.

To bring fiscal sanity back to Washington and make our government an instrument of the public good, not of private plunder.

To restore America's standing in the world, to end the war in Iraq, bring our troops home and honor their service by caring for our veterans.

And to join with our allies to confront our shared challenges, from poverty and genocide to terrorism and global warming.

Most of all, I ran to stand up for all those who have been invisible to their government for eight long years.

Those are the reasons I ran for president. Those are the reasons I support Barack Obama. And those are the reasons you should too.

I want you to ask yourselves: Were you in this campaign just for me? Or were you in it for that young Marine and others like him? Were you in it for that mom struggling with cancer while raising her kids? Were you in it for that boy and his mom surviving on the minimum wage? Were you in it for all the people in this country who feel invisible?

We need leaders once again who can tap into that special blend of American confidence and optimism that has enabled generations before us to meet our toughest challenges. Leaders who can help us show ourselves and the world that with our ingenuity, creativity, and innovative spirit, there are no limits to what is possible in America.

This won't be easy. Progress never is. But it will be impossible if we don't fight to put a Democrat in the White House.

We need to elect Barack Obama because we need a President who understands that America can't compete in a global economy by padding the pockets of energy speculators, while ignoring the workers whose jobs have been shipped overseas. We need a president who understands that we can't solve the problems of global warming by giving windfall profits to the oil companies while ignoring opportunities to invest in new technologies that will build a green economy.

We need a President who understands that the genius of America has always depended on the strength and vitality of the middle class.

Barack Obama began his career fighting for workers displaced by the global economy. He built his campaign on a fundamental belief that change in this country must start from the ground up, not the top down. He knows government must be about "We the people" not "We the favored few."

And when Barack Obama is in the White House, he'll revitalize our economy, defend the working people of America, and meet the global challenges of our time. Democrats know how to do this. As I recall, President Clinton and the Democrats did it before. And President Obama and the Democrats will do it again.

He'll transform our energy agenda by creating millions of green jobs and building a new, clean energy future. He'll make sure that middle class families get the tax relief they deserve. And I can't wait to watch Barack Obama sign a health care plan into law that covers every single American.

Barack Obama will end the war in Iraq responsibly and bring our troops home --a first step to repairing our alliances around the world.

And he will have with him a terrific partner in Michelle Obama. Anyone who saw Michelle's speech last night knows she will be a great first lady for America.

Americans are also fortunate that Joe Biden will be at Barack Obama's side. He is a strong leader and a good man. He understands both the economic stresses here at home and the strategic challenges abroad. He is pragmatic, tough, and wise. And, of course, Joe will be supported by his wonderful wife, Jill.

They will be a great team for our country.

Now, John McCain is my colleague and my friend.

He has served our country with honor and courage.

But we don't need four more years ... of the last eight years.

More economic stagnation ... and less affordable health care.

More high gas prices ... and less alternative energy.

More jobs getting shipped overseas ... and fewer jobs created here.

More skyrocketing debt ... home foreclosures ... and mounting bills that are crushing our middle class families.

More war ... less diplomacy.

More of a government where the privileged come first ... and everyone else comes last.

John McCain says the economy is fundamentally sound. John McCain doesn't think that 47 million people without health insurance is a crisis. John McCain wants to privatize Social Security. And in 2008, he still thinks it's OK when women don't earn equal pay for equal work.

With an agenda like that, it makes sense that George Bush and John McCain will be together next week in the Twin Cities. Because these days they're awfully hard to tell apart.

America is still around after 232 years because we have risen to the challenge of every new time, changing to be faithful to our values of equal opportunity for all and the common good.

And I know what that can mean for every man, woman, and child in America. I'm a United States senator because in 1848 a group of courageous women and a few brave men gathered in Seneca Falls, New York, many traveling for days and nights, to participate in the first convention on women's rights in our history.

And so dawned a struggle for the right to vote that would last 72 years, handed down by mother to daughter to granddaughter -- and a few sons and grandsons along the way.

These women and men looked into their daughters' eyes, imagined a fairer and freer world, and found the strength to fight. To rally and picket. To endure ridicule and harassment. To brave violence and jail.

And after so many decades -- 88 years ago on this very day -- the 19th amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote would be forever enshrined in our Constitution.

My mother was born before women could vote. But in this election my daughter got to vote for her mother for president.

This is the story of America. Of women and men who defy the odds and never give up.

How do we give this country back to them?

By following the example of a brave New Yorker, a woman who risked her life to shepherd slaves along the Underground Railroad.

And on that path to freedom, Harriet Tubman had one piece of advice.

If you hear the dogs, keep going.

If you see the torches in the woods, keep going.

If they're shouting after you, keep going.

Don't ever stop. Keep going.

If you want a taste of freedom, keep going.

Even in the darkest of moments, ordinary Americans have found the faith to keep going.

I've seen it in you. I've seen it in our teachers and firefighters, nurses and police officers, small business owners and union workers, the men and women of our military -- you always keep going.

We are Americans. We're not big on quitting.

But remember, before we can keep going, we have to get going by electing Barack Obama president.

We don't have a moment to lose or a vote to spare.

Nothing less than the fate of our nation and the future of our children hang in the balance.

I want you to think about your children and grandchildren come election day. And think about the choices your parents and grandparents made that had such a big impact on your life and on the life of our nation.

We've got to ensure that the choice we make in this election honors the sacrifices of all who came before us, and will fill the lives of our children with possibility and hope.

That is our duty, to build that bright future, and to teach our children that in America there is no chasm too deep, no barrier too great -- and no ceiling too high -- for all who work hard, never back down, always keep going, have faith in God, in our country, and in each other.

Thank you so much. God bless America and Godspeed to you all.

 

Comments

Yes I agree Norm, VERY good message...Kuchinic gave a great one as well, too a MUCH smaller croud.

Yes I agree Norm, VERY good message. Kuchinic gave a great one as well, too a MUCH smaller croud.

Can you post Kucinich's speech?

lol sorry about that...

...I ment Kucinich. :P

I'm not that far through the clip yet, but why is the camera spending half its time on Bill?

powerful, well done, hillary.

question: she said in 2008 john mcain still thinks its ok that women don't earn equal pay for equal work. can this be so? he really doesn't believe in the principle of equal pay for equal work, without regard to gender?

also, i know the glass ceiling still exists, but once a woman is hired to a position these days in america, doesn't she make the same as a man in the same position? forgive my naivete, but i found both of these things absolutely astounding. it was almost like hearing her say "and we must, my fellow americans, change our economy from being buggy whip based and embrace the internal combustion engine. and we must, finally, put an end to slavery."

speaking of which, i got distracted at one point and might have missed it, but did she mention torture?

It was as good a piece of oratory as could have been delivered under the circumstances. The whiners (Shearer at HuffPo today and the commenter above) who are complaining about issues that she didn't tick off should just shut up. This was not a speech about issue-tracking but about overcoming factionalism.

I agree with Dende (and some others): This was powerful and pitch-perfect. It came across as sincere, deeply felt, and appropriately focused on the issues, deflecting attention from herself as a symbol ('Was it just for me that you...')

Jonathan raises an important issue (one of the most important, in my view, with regard to drawing Clinton supporters away from McCain):

question: she said in 2008 john mcain still thinks its ok that women don't earn equal pay for equal work. can this be so? he really doesn't believe in the principle of equal pay for equal work, without regard to gender?

Yeah, this was the most important part of the speech for me--I've been waiting for someone to mention that he opposed such legislation. (See also: here

Republican Sen. John McCain, campaigning through poverty-stricken cities and towns, said Wednesday he opposes a Senate bill that seeks equal pay for women because it would lead to more lawsuits.

Senate Republicans killed the bill Wednesday night on a 56-42 vote that denied the measure the 60 votes needed to advance it to full debate and a vote. Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., had delayed the vote to give McCain's Democratic rivals, Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama, time to return to Washington to support the measure, which would make it easier for women to sue their employers for pay discrimination.

McCain skipped the vote to campaign in New Orleans.

"I am all in favor of pay equity for women, but this kind of legislation, as is typical of what's being proposed by my friends on the other side of the aisle, opens us up to lawsuits for all kinds of problems," the expected GOP presidential nominee told reporters. "This is government playing a much, much greater role in the business of a private enterprise system."

In other words, he's in favor of equal pay for women, but doesn't want legislation that would explicitly protect them. In other words, his support is merely verbal and empty, amounting to not much more than "Yeah, it's a nice idea, but let's not make any legislation to ensure that it actually happens."

I've been waiting for someone to mention that he opposed such legislation. (See also: here
... "I am all in favor of pay equity for women, but this kind of legislation, as is typical of what's being proposed by my friends on the other side of the aisle, opens us up to lawsuits for all kinds of problems," the expected GOP presidential nominee told reporters. "This is government playing a much, much greater role in the business of a private enterprise system."

In other words, he's in favor of equal pay for women, but doesn't want legislation that would explicitly protect them.

Well, McCain may have valid criticisms with regards to the lawsuits, but he is settling on the usual wrong conclusion for the usual ill purposes, as is typical for a Republican.

Yes, maybe the legislation won't work every well because the whole system is rather broken, but he's suggesting just not doing anything, and making sure everything stays broken and continues to fall apart. Not a very constructive way to affect policy, to say the least...

Indeed, in America, "Republican" has become a synonym for "destructive".

Syngas, in 1967, $35,379 was worth approx. $232,000 (depending on whose inflation calculator you use).

I don't get your point.

On page 13 though, from 2004 to 05, single women households income went down $200, while single men household income went up $1,200.

Oh, and page 14 shows that women make $10k less than men on average.

Were you trying to reinforce the point that hillary is right? Thanks!

Thanks Hillary. Perhaps the mythical 23% of her supporters will come to their senses... This was an absolutely critical speech.

Syngas, in 1967, $35,379 was worth approx. $232,000 (depending on whose inflation calculator you use).

I don't get your point.

Real income means in inflation adjusted dollars, but I suspect you know that--which inflation calculator did you use? At any rate, I agree about what the larger point is, as I don't follow.

Frenetic. Good point, but see the linked article from Slate, about the supreme court case to which the legislation was a response:

As Rich Ford pointed out in Slate after the Supreme Court's decision, the clear lesson the case holds for employees is, "Sue early and often. If you suspect your boss might be discriminating with regard to your pay, you can't afford to wait around until you're sure." The Equal Pay Bill might give rise to more meritorious law suits. But couldn't it also stave off some losers? And what does it mean to be for pay equity for women while opposing what's on offer to actually help achieve it?

Frankly, I haven't looked at the SCOTUS decision myself, but at least some think blocking the legislation may actually work to inhibit unmeritorious law-suits. And if they do have merit, then the fact of bringing suit should be a good thing, not a negative.

Real income means in inflation adjusted dollars, but I suspect you know that--which inflation calculator did you use?

Sorry, I should be more clear. I take it that if $35,379 figure for '67 represents real median income, then that is not the actual amount people made at the time--for the reason you point out--but the worth, represented in today's dollars, of what they earned.

The whiners (... the commenter above)... should just shut up.

boy, this just isn't my week. i wasn't whining, brian, rather asking a question about mccain's position on equal pay/equal work that hillary brought up, contrary to your assertion, in one of the parts of her speech that WASN'T about overcoming factionalism, but rather about throwing down the gauntlet. there wasn't a single word in my post that could possibly be interpreted as whining or complaining.

anyway, adam kindly answered my question (he seemed to think it was a good one), even throwing in a few links. so, thanks, adam.

Real income means in inflation adjusted dollars, but I suspect you know that

I suspected that, But I didn't know for certain. Thanks. I'm ashamed to say, i never took an economics class ...

In other words, he's in favor of equal pay for women, but doesn't want legislation that would explicitly protect them

Your type will never tire of this completely transparent tactic, will you?

McCain states directly why he didn't support the legislation: he believes changing the terms would open up the floodgates for more lawsuits. The issue isn't over 'equal pay', it's over the statute of limitations for equal pay lawsuits; indeed, about statutes of limitation in general.

For everything that is considered a crime there is some heartbreaking case where a victim didn't get their case to court in time. Yet we still have statutes of limitation for almost all crimes, because without them the courts would be more overburdened than they already are.

Is this really all the Democrats have - creating a culture of victimhood? A false foundation to create a "Republicans hate women!" argument, based upon the mostly false assertion that women aren't paid equally (many studies have shown that among other things women generally work fewer hours than men, which explains most pay inequity).

And seeing everybody fall all over themselves to praise Hillary's speech - that's priceless. The same woman who ruthlessly tore down Obama is now calling him the best thing since sliced bread. Why? Because her back is against the wall. You know that she's lying when she says she supports him, yet you cheerfully accept the lie and call her professionally-crafted fiction 'her best speech ever'. Such self-delusion.

And seeing everybody fall all over themselves to praise Hillary's speech - that's priceless.

And it will also be priceless when a Romney or other Republican does exactly the same thing.

I like calli.

He reminds me why I vote against his preferred politicians.

He gives me the kick in the pants to not stop working against people who will play the fear card "tax and spend democrat" and then spend 3 trillion on a failed war proven to be built on a lie. That is, an OPTIONAL war, run by men who refused to serve themselves.

He knowingly lied to congress. That is a felony.

People who would rather 'out' a CIA agent specializing in WMDs in 3rd world countries than accept criticism of their policies.

This is treason.

Bush pardoned the criminal proven guilty of this in court.

I mean, the republicans are so bad, that 14 months after 9/11, the largest peace march in history took place, against BUSH. Yes, he is so bad at his job that he was less popular than Saddam. This is perhaps the worst diplomacy failure in history.

And during the RNC, you will see McCain with Bush, happy as punch.

If McCain were a man worth his mustard, he would speak truth to power, the presidency be damned. Instead he sucks up to these people, to the churches, to the neo-cons, he changes his hard fought positions.

I used to respect John Sinclair McCain, III (owner of many houses and defender of the poor), but if he has changed this much to have a chance at the presidency, what will he do once he is there?

btw, calli,

Democrats do whine, and want free things and all of the things you say. The leaders are often sellouts to corporations and other lobbys. It is a disorganized party that barely gets anything done.

You are right about most of it, but the 'side' you represent does things far far worse. You are a smart cookie, surely you know this.

We are all for fiscal responsibility, personal responsibility, but the side you represent is borrowing money from the Chinese that your children will have to repay. How is that responsible?

We spend more than the rest of the world combined for our military. Logically, how can we defend that? A strong military, sure, but as much as the rest of the world, COMBINED? Who do we plan on fighting? And we borrow from a communist country to pay for it?

Bush had Congress and the Courts in his pocket and did NOTHING to help end our health care issue. We spend more on health care than any developed nation and what do we have to show for it?

I go to Children's Hospital of Los Angeles for my daughters heart surgeries. A wonderful hospital that turns no patient away. Our insurance only pays them about half of what they charge, and we have very good insurance. We asked the accountant there how the hospital survives. She said one word: "donations". 20% of the staff are free volunteers. The best heart surgeon on the world is there, and he and his staff work at greatly reduced rates.

Calli. We need to give medical assistance to our children.

HOW do you think we should do that?

I'm organizing a blood drive at Disney Studios in my daughters name.

HOW have YOU helped?

From my vantage point, I wish Hillary had included Barack in some of her "I did this" talking points. Did Obama not go in and talk to single mothers, families living on the minimum wage, spend a day side by side workers. Yes, he did, and at least one spoke yesterday.

I do understand that the Hill-bots needed to hear her tout her accomplishments and then tell them to vote for Barack. I think it's unfortunate that is the case, but do what you have to do to keep them from cutting off their noses to spite their faces. Get o in office, not McCain, for goodness sake! (or yummy sake, take your choice)

Still, to stave off the GOP attack ads that will undoubtedly surface, it would've been nice for HRC to acknowledge that Obama ran a good campaign, he was a formidable and admirable rival, both put up a fight for the spot, and he was the assured winner. C'est la vie; today's Wednesday and it's Bill's turn tonight.

I'm just a hopin' that BHO delivers a speech on the lines of his Berlin visit. Fingers crossed.

Calligraph, I don't know how many Republicans hate women, but their actions seem to show that they are pretty irritated at women's attempts to gain equality in pay. The conservatives on the court read a limitation into non-discrimination law that makes the law almost useless. Then they filibuster attempts to clarify the statute. It's almost as if they're trying to legislate away the non-discrimination statutes from the bench.

Oddly enough, conservatives on the bench abandon completely original intent when it comes to modern statutes. It's cool to twist the intentions of the framers, as long as the framers lived in the past 100 years.

"Did Obama not go in and talk to single mothers, families living on the minimum wage, spend a day side by side workers."

She was the first person I've heard so far mention that Obama spent the beginning of his career organizing with laid-off manufacturing workers.

We are all for fiscal responsibility, personal responsibility, but the side you represent is borrowing money from the Chinese that your children will have to repay. How is that responsible?

Do you really believe that to be true? Do you not read the news when it is repeatedly announced that the "no more bullshit, Mr. Bush!" Democratic Congress has passed yet another war funding bill?

I'm entirely with you in concept on this idea - I would love it if we didn't have the Iraq war to fund (or the Afghanistan war, for that matter). But we do. We went there, Democrats and Republicans alike voting for the issue.

Calli. We need to give medical assistance to our children.

No, we need medical assistance for everyone. I'm still anxious to hear a plan from anybody to get such a thing. This was one of the bigger disappointments of Obama's campaign for me - that he has no real ideas for health care (or much else for that matter).

I don't know how many Republicans hate women, but their actions seem to show that they are pretty irritated at women's attempts to gain equality in pay

Conservatives hate legislation. And with good reason - people literally sue at the drop of a hat (see: Butterfinger versus Stetson).

The whole 'women make less money than men' thing is a gigantic separate argument - as I said, there are figures that show men work harder jobs and longer hours, plus women simply don't ask for pay raises as often as men do - but that's not even the matter being discussed. This is just classic misrepresentation.

Conservatives may hate legislation, may want to balance the budget, etc. but by this measure, the Republicans are not conservatives.

Hell, if they were, I'd vote for them.

I saw a statistic somewhere on the amount of Pork in legislation passed in the last 6 years of the Republican controlled government compaired to previous decades. It was astounding.

Calli, refresh my memory, but were you for a more conservatice candidate than McCain previously? Ron Paul would have gotten my vote. I dig that guy.

And again, what you YOU done to help our health care crisis again? Frantic typing on 1gm?

Actions my friend, actions.

Your type will never tire of this completely transparent tactic, will you? McCain states directly why he didn't support the legislation: he believes changing the terms would open up the floodgates for more lawsuits.

And I addressed that remark, directly. But do you realize how transparent it is that you don't read either the argument or the links that support it, not only on my comments but those of many others as well? I already explicitly responded to McCain's disingenuous appeal to increased law suits, which is a red-herring. Despite the fact, as I have already suggested, that his proposed course, if followed, was likely to have the opposite effect of what he intended, saying you support a general policy, but don't want to enforce it or take the necessary means to it, means that you really don't support it.

Is this really all the Democrats have - creating a culture of victimhood?

Wonderful. You take some person or group who has been exploited, and when people cry foul, and say that measures need to be taken to rid the world of an injustice, somehow their creating a 'culture of victimhood'. If I ever find myself in court on civil or criminal charges, I'll be sure to charge them with that--I'm sure they'll get a kick out of it.

Did you know that most of what you say here is a lot right-wing thought-cliche? And that your attempts to point out that we are the left wing version of this often rests on absurd caricatures that bears little discernible relation to what we actually say? Why not at least try to offer an argument and some evidence. Last I recalled, that's how things work here, whatever one's political sympathies.

Magnolia,

I meant the actual page eleven of the report, not page 11 of the PDF. I should have been more clear.

My point was that the income gap between men and women is narrowing. In 1967, women made $.60 for every dollar men made. In 2006, women made .77 for every dollar men made, and all of that progress has been made since the 'class war' began in 1980.

Thanks syn. Much more clear.

McCain voting against the legislation due to "statute of limitations" argument is a red herring. If McCain really thought the legislation was good, and that the limitation issue was his only complaint, then amend the damn bill. Change the statute of limitations, or change the length of them, whatever his beef was. He is a senator you know, he does have the power to do such things.

On an anecdotal note, my experience with women bosses (I've had several), is that they are much harder on female employees than they are on male employees. The reverse hasn't seemed to have been the case. It almost seemed like they were creating the glass ceiling they complained about.

It almost seemed like they were creating the glass ceiling they complained about.

Me and my wife have this discussion a lot. We think that the impedance and unfairness to women is usually more on the Female side than the male side, and that women are more critical of how other women look than men are. She seems to think that this is because women at the top have had to work so hard in the male dominated workforce to get to the top, that they feel it wouldn't be 'fair' unless they made all other women struggle to get there.

Who knows. But I've had the same experiences, female bosses are always harder on female employees, as I have observed. The reasons for that would be an interesting sociological study.

Wouldn't it be funny irony if most of the defendants of such lawsuits ended up being women?

I do think women and men have different methods of getting things done but I do think generalizations don't work.

I think hours are more related to position than gender.

I can only speak to the industries I've worked in (entertainment and high tech) but women don't get the titles (and the pay) even though they are doing the same work. Women are often very competitive with other women because they are often not only competing professionally but also socially. But, when you are in an arena where you are actually professionally competing with a male (not that common in my experience - there is usually some reason a male and female will not be in direct competition) - my experience has been they are just as professionally competitive.

In a more junior position, I only had one female boss and she was very b@tchy toward me - she told me to stop wearing skirts because people might think she was my assistant instead of the reverse and didn't want me to take classes related to our industry because then I would know more than she did (none of the male bosses I had had the same worries) but, when I got into higher positions, I met some great women who have been nothing but supportive.

I think physically, it is harder for a woman to be a boss than a man (just like physically, it is easier for a taller man to be a boss than a shorter one). You have to work at it harder as a female (maybe even more with other females?)and I think the easiest way to do it might come across like a b@tch (where - if a man did the same thing, it would come off as businesslike.)

It's not an easy role and that's why I've been watching the groundbreaking Hillary has done with a lot of interest and admiration. Nothing was funnier than when people flipped at seeing a little cleavage (ohmigawd - what was she trying to do??)

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